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Should You Talk To Federal Law Enforcement?

If law enforcement comes knocking on your door, you might think that you have to answer their questions. Knowing whether you should talk to federal law enforcement can mean the difference between going about your business and facing serious federal charges. When law enforcement asks to speak with you, it can be hard to know how to handle it. Should you talk to federal law enforcement? Here’s what you should know about interacting with law enforcement.

Is it a good idea to talk to federal law enforcement?

As a general rule, you should not talk to federal law enforcement. You might think that talking with law enforcement can clear up misconceptions and prevent you from facing federal charges, but law enforcement rarely ends a criminal investigation based on a statement from a suspect. The best plan is to politely but firmly decline to speak to law enforcement and request assistance from an attorney. Your attorney can help you respond appropriately or exercise your right to remain silent.

Federal laws are complex

There are many federal laws. Most people know very little about what federal laws exist. You may think that you haven’t violated any laws, but there are laws that you may not be aware of. Something that you say that you think is helpful to your situation can end up being the thing that law enforcement uses against you. Your best bet is not to make assumptions about the law and refrain from talking to law enforcement until you can work with an attorney.

Talking to law enforcement may prompt a mistake

Witnesses aren’t always truthful or accurate. They can be dishonest and they can be mistaken. If you tell law enforcement that you were in a certain place at a certain time, you might be unwittingly putting yourself at the scene of a crime. Unfortunately, there are coincidences in life, and coincidences can occur in the law enforcement world.

Law enforcement may not carefully evaluate what you claim. They may not care to look into the details or nuances that you tell them. In addition, a witness may provide information that isn’t accurate. Witnesses may have reasons that they don’t tell the truth. In addition, they may not have an accurate perception of what they see or hear. When you talk to law enforcement, it can confuse them and throw them off the path of determining the truth. You should not talk to law enforcement in order to avoid confusion.

Law enforcement doesn’t have to be honest when they talk to you

Even though you might think that law enforcement officers have a duty to be honest with the people they serve, the truth is that law enforcement officers can lie during their investigations. If they think it is going to prompt you to make a confession, law enforcement officers may be dishonest. They may mislead you in hopes that you’re going to offer additional information in order to try and clear up the confusion.

Remember that when you talk to law enforcement, you’re talking to trained interrogators. Law enforcement officers have training in how to get people to confess to crimes. They know tactics to make you question what you know to be true. Law enforcement may care about getting you to confess more than they care about determining the truth. As soon as you tell law enforcement that you want the help of an attorney, they must stop the interview.

Your constitutional right to remain silent

Your right to remain silent comes from the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The Fifth Amendment says that a person has the right to refuse to make statements that are self-incriminating. In the U.S. Supreme Court case Miranda v. Arizona, the Court explained what the Fifth Amendment means. When you’re placed under arrest, you have the right to the assistance of legal counsel. You may refuse to make statements.

When you speak to the police, they may try to admit your statements in court. Of course, they may try to take your statements out of context, and they might paraphrase what you say without recording it. You should not talk to law enforcement without the assistance of an attorney. If it’s ever appropriate to speak with law enforcement, an experienced lawyer can help you determine how best to go about approaching the interaction and protect your rights.

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Manhattan

85 Broad Street, 30th Floor
New York, NY 10005

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888-977-6335

Queens

35-37 36th St,
Astoria, NY 11106

Phone

888-977-6335

Brooklyn

195 Montague St.
14th Floor,
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Phone

888-977-6335