FREE CONSULTATIONS & WE'RE AVAILABLE 24/7

Aug 7, 2018

NYC Business Torts Lawyer

In the court system, business torts refer to torts that outline common law liability rules. These rules arise from a number of business transactions, including interference with business or economic relationships. Business torts, also referred to as economic torts, are most likely to involve a pure economic loss.

A business tort occurs when a party uses a tortious interference action in an attempt to protect their business or trade. Tortious interference refers to a practice wherein one party will purposefully damage another party’s business relationships with a third party. Business torts cover a number of different areas, including doctrines about restraint of trade.

Business torts don’t occur as often as they used to, historically speaking. The practice occurred far more often during the twentieth century. Different laws have been enacted to prevent the occurrence of business torts in practices all over the world. In NYC, the facts are the same.

Labor laws and modern competition laws tend to cover the areas typically sabotaged by business torts. A business cannot legally sabotage a competing business, thanks to rules of modern competition. There are also laws about the government of intellectual property that can be related to this, particularly regarding unfair competition laws. It is illegal for a single competitor or a unified group of competitors to take action with the sole intent of harming another business.

The main forms of business torts are:

  • Passing off, a common law tort that businesses use to enforce the rights of unregistered trademarks
  • Injurious falsehood, in which a person lies about another party with the intention of damaging their reputation or business
  • Civil conspiracy, in which two or more businesses agree to deprive a third business of their legal rights or convince the third party to seek an illegal objective
  • Inducement of a breach of contract by another party
  • Tortious interference, causing economic harm to another person’s business by damaging their relationships with third parties
  • Negligent misrepresentation, in which a party knowingly leads another party to believe something that is untrue

These torts are defined in the common law. Historically, they’re a representation of the attempts made to balance claimant protection against people who inflict economic harm. They also show the wider economic need to allow aggressive competition between similar businesses, as well as between employers and their employees.

In the past, these torts could be committed without the perpetrator suffering any legal repercussions. This is why they’ve been codified into common law. However, in the twenty-first century, legislators have acknowledged that torts rely on unfair business practices and malicious falsehoods. Therefore, laws have been enacted to prevent torts from being committed between the businesses of today.

This is a more in-depth explanation of how each of these laws relates to torts and their legality:

Collective labor laws have been enacted at both the state and federal level. These laws provide regulations and rules for the relationship that workers, employers, the government, and trade unions can have. The labor laws are designed to keep workers from being taken advantage of by their employers, and to allow workers to access unions without suffering consequences from their employers.

Modern competition law governs the ways that competing businesses can interact with each other. It’s no longer legal for businesses to maliciously undercut each other’s third party relationships, or for business owners to spread slanderous rumors about their competition. The law seeks to promote competition between businesses. The torts, meanwhile, were a way for businesses to try to eliminate the competition and secure a monopoly.

Intellectual property rights are a way of securing the intangible ideas generated by the human mind. Unfair competition laws, meanwhile, outlaw the use of deceptive business practices by banning companies from joining together to harm their competition. Where intellectual property rights and unfair competition laws intersect, businesses are prohibited from stealing each other’s intellectual content or innovations.

An NYC business tort lawyer can serve two potential purposes:

  • If you’ve been accused of committing an illegal business tort, they can represent you through the litigation and negotiation process
  • If you believe you’ve been a victim of an illegal business tort, they can help you file an official complaint and gather evidence about the practice

Committing any common law business tort is a serious infraction. No matter which tort it was, there are a number of state and federal regulations that are being violated. If you’ve been accused of committing one of these practices, you need an experienced lawyer to prepare the best possible defense. If you need to file a complaint against someone else because of their conduct, your lawyer should help you negotiate the process.

Litigation is a long and complex process no matter who the involved parties are. It’s just as complicated to file a lawsuit or civil complaint as it is to respond to it. Your attorney will be able to take you through basic negotiations and demand letters before any official lawsuits are filed. However, if demand letters and negotiations aren’t able to settle the situation informally, the case will proceed in a more legal-bound direction.

You should make sure your lawyer has experience navigating these different areas of business laws and regulations. They should have negotiated unfair competition cases, modern competition laws, and labor laws. They should also have a good sense of how to collect evidence to mount either a defense or offense.

Request Free Consultation

Testimonials

Request Free Consultation

Please fill out the form below to receive a free consultation, we will respond to your inquiry within 24-hours guaranteed.

Manhattan

85 Broad Street, 30th Floor
New York, NY 10005

Queens

35-37 36th St,
Astoria, NY 11106

Brooklyn

195 Montague St.
14th Floor,
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Manhattan

85 Broad Street, 30th Floor
New York, NY 10005

Phone

888-977-6335

Queens

35-37 36th St,
Astoria, NY 11106

Phone

888-977-6335

Brooklyn

195 Montague St.
14th Floor,
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Phone

888-977-6335